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Acetyltransferase

Renders tabtoxin-producing pathogens tolerant to their own phytotoxins.

Below are the list of possible Acetyltransferase products. If you cannot find the target and/or product is not available in our catalog, please click here to contact us and request the product or submit your request for custom elisa kit production, custom recombinant protein production or custom antibody production. Custom ELISA Kits, Recombinant Proteins and Antibodies can be designed, manufactured and produced according to the researcher's specifications.

Acetyltransferase

Also known as Acetyltransferase (Tabtoxin resistance protein).
Renders tabtoxin-producing pathogens tolerant to their own phytotoxins.

Acetyltransferase At1g77540

Also known as Acetyltransferase At1g77540 (Minimal acetyltransferase).
Encodes a H3/H4 histone acetyltransferase. Belongs to the GNAT family, whose many members are involved in histone acetylation and chromatin remodeling, and are important for the regulation of cell growth and development.

Acetyltransferase Atu2258

Also known as Acetyltransferase Atu2258 (GCN5-related N-acetyltransferase) (GNAT).
Catalyzes the transfer of an acetyl group from acetyl coenzyme A (AcCoA) to an acceptor substrate and releases both CoA and the acetylated product. It prefers glucosamine 6-phosphate or dopamine. It can also use the thialysine, N(8)-acetylspermidine, chloramphenicol, puromycin, polymyxin B, and 4-aminobutyrate ethyl ester.

Acetyltransferase CD1211

Also known as Acetyltransferase CD1211 (GCN5-related N-acetyltransferase) (GNAT).
Catalyzes the transfer of an acetyl group from acetyl coenzyme A (AcCoA) to an acceptor substrate and releases both CoA and the acetylated product. It prefers L-threonine, L-serine and L-methionine. It can also use O-acetyl-L-serine, L-tryptophan, L-isoleucine, L-valine, L-homoserine, 7-aminocephalosporanic acid, thiamine pyrophosphate and thiamine.

Acetyltransferase NSI

Also known as Acetyltransferase NSI (Nuclear shuttle protein-interacting protein).
Encodes a nuclear acetyltransferase (NSI)that interacts with the geminivirus movement protein NSP. This interaction is required for viral infection and systemic spread. Acetylates the viral coat protein (CP) in vitro, but not NSP. NSP inhibits NSI activity in vitro. NSI is highly transcribed in phloem and in xylem parenchyma cells, and in the apical meristem and guard cells, within young tissues in Arabidopsis, and its expression is turned off as tissues mature.

Acetyltransferase PA2271

Also known as Acetyltransferase PA2271 (GCN5-related N-acetyltransferase) (GNAT).
Catalyzes the transfer of an acetyl group from acetyl coenzyme A (AcCoA) to an acceptor substrate and releases both CoA and the acetylated product. It can use a variety of substrates including spermidine, spermine and N(8)-acetylspermidine, 7-aminocephalosporanic acid, colistin and thiamine.

Acetyltransferase PA2578

Also known as Acetyltransferase PA2578 (GCN5-related N-acetyltransferase) (GNAT).
Catalyzes the transfer of an acetyl group from acetyl coenzyme A (AcCoA) to an acceptor substrate and releases both CoA and the acetylated product. It prefers the antibiotic chloramphenicol.

Acetyltransferase PA3944

Also known as Acetyltransferase PA3944 (GCN5-related N-acetyltransferase) (GNAT).
Catalyzes the transfer of an acetyl group from acetyl coenzyme A (AcCoA) to an acceptor substrate and releases both CoA and the acetylated product. It prefers the peptide Asp-Phe methyl ester (or aspartame) and the peptide antibiotics polymyxin B and colistin. Other substrates like dopamine, serotonin, puromycin, chloramphenicol, D-glucosamine, glycine and N-alpha-acetyl-L-glutamine are used and displayed lower activity.

Acetyltransferase PA5475

Also known as Acetyltransferase PA5475 (GCN5-related N-acetyltransferase) (GNAT).
Catalyzes the transfer of an acetyl group from acetyl coenzyme A (AcCoA) to an acceptor substrate and releases both CoA and the acetylated product. It prefers the antibiotic chloramphenicol.

Acetyltransferase Pat

Also known as Acetyltransferase Pat (GCN5-like enzyme) (GCN5-related N-acetyltransferase) (GNAT) (Protein acetyltransferase) (Pat).
Catalyzes specifically the acetylation of the epsilon-amino group of a highly conserved lysine residue in acetyl-CoA synthetase (ACS). This acetylation results in the inactivation of ACS activity and could be important for mycobacteria to adjust to environmental changes.

Acetyltransferase PseH

Also known as Acetyltransferase PseH (Pseudaminic acid biosynthesis protein H).
Catalyzes the third step in the biosynthesis of pseudaminic acid, a sialic-acid-like sugar that is used to modify flagellin. Mediates N-4 acetylation of UDP-4-amino-4,6-dideoxy-beta-L-AltNAc to form UDP-2,4-diacetamido-2,4,6-trideoxy-beta-L-altropyranose ().

Acetyltransferase pyr8

Also known as Acetyltransferase pyr8 (Pyripyropene synthesis protein 8).
Acetyltransferase; part of the gene cluster that mediates the biosynthesis of pyripyropene A, a specific human acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase 2 inhibitor (PubMed:20861902). The first step of the pathway is the synthesis of nicotinyl-CoA from nicotinic acid by the nicotinic acid-CoA ligase pyr1 (PubMed:20861902). Nicotinyl-CoA is then a substrate of polyketide synthase pyr2 to produce 4-hydroxy-6-(3-pyridinyl)-2H-pyran-2-one (HPPO) which is further prenylated by the polyprenyl transferase pyr6 to yield farnesyl-HPPO (PubMed:20861902). The next steps consist of an epoxidation of farnesyl-HPPO to epoxyfarnesyl-HPPO by FAD-dependent monooxygenase pyr5 and a cyclization of the terpenoid portion by the terpene cyclase pyr4 to yield deacetyl-pyripyropene E (PubMed:20861902). The 2 cytochrome P450 monooxygenases pyr3 and pyr9, and the 2 acetyltransferases pyr7 and pyr8 are involved in the conversion of deacetyl-pyripyropene E into pyripyropene A through several cycles of oxidation and acetylation steps (PubMed:20861902). Pyr7 acetylates deacetyl-pyripyropene E to pyripyropene E which is oxidized to 11-deacetyl-pyripyropene O by pyr3, which is in turn acetylated into pyripyropene O by pyr8 (PubMed:21224862, PubMed:26019565). Pyripyropene O is then oxidized to deacetyl-pyripyropene A by pyr9 (PubMed:21224862). Deacetyl-pyripyropene A is finally acetylated to pyripyropene A by pyr8 (PubMed:26019565).

Acetyltransferase SACOL1063

Also known as Acetyltransferase SACOL1063 (GCN5-related N-acetyltransferase) (GNAT).
Catalyzes the transfer of an acetyl group from acetyl coenzyme A (AcCoA) to an acceptor substrate and releases both CoA and the acetylated product. It displays the highest activity for L-threonine. It can also use L-tryptophan, and to a much lesser extent L-tyrosine.

Acetyltransferase sirH

Also known as Acetyltransferase sirH (Sirodesmin biosynthesis protein H).
Acetyltransferase; part of the gene cluster that mediates the biosynthesis of sirodesmin PL, an epipolythiodioxopiperazine (ETP) characterized by a disulfide bridged cyclic dipeptide and that acts as a phytotoxin which is involved in the blackleg didease of canola (PubMed:15387811, PubMed:18272357, PubMed:19762440). SirD catalyzes the O-prenylation of L-tyrosine (L-Tyr) in the presence of dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP) to yield 4-O-dimethylallyl-L-Tyr, and therefore represents probably the first pathway-specific enzyme in the biosynthesis of sirodesmin PL (PubMed:19762440, PubMed:21038099, PubMed:24083562). 4-O-dimethylallyl-L-Tyr, then undergoes condensation with L-Ser in a reaction catalyzed by the non-ribosomal peptide synthase sirP to form the diketopiperazine (DKP) backbone (PubMed:18272357). Further bishydroxylation of the DKP performed by the cytochrome P450 monooxygenase sirC leads to the production of the intermediate phomamide (PubMed:27390873). This step is essential to form the reactive thiol group required for toxicity of sirodesmin PL (PubMed:27390873). The next steps of sirodesmin biosynthesis are not well understood yet, but some predictions could be made from intermediate compounds identification (PubMed:18272357). Phomamide is converted into phomalizarine via oxidation, probably by sirT (PubMed:18272357). Further oxidation, methylation (by sirM or sirN) and reduction steps convert phomalizarine to deacetyl sirodesmin (PubMed:18272357). Finally, acetyltransferase sirH probably acetylates deacetyl sirodesmin to produce sirodesmin PL (PubMed:18272357).
Proteins Root Name Listing
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